Dacre: St Andrews Church

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In the village of Dacre stands the parish Church of St Andrew. Constructed of sandstone rubble walls, the church dates to the late 12th century. With 13th century additions, the building was rebuilt in 1810 and features battlemented parapets which date to the 19th century. The church has a west tower of three storeys with an inscription above the entrance noting that the steeple was rebuilt in 1810.

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The church has an open timber roof which dates to the 17th century

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The three bay chancel retains 12th century narrow round-headed windows and has a late 17th century communion rail with twisted balusters.

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The nave features the original 12th century unmoulded round-headed tower arch and has two light clerestory windows. The four bay arcades date from the early 13th century and differ from one another. The north arcade is earlier having arches with slight chamfers and piers that are mostly round while the south arcade arches have normal chamfers and octagonal piers.

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Engraved window memorial to Sylvia McCosh of Dalemain

In the chancel of the church is an engraved window (above) by Sir Laurence Whistler as a memorial to Sylvia McCosh. Whistler was a poet, writer and glass engraver who revived the technique of line engraving on both sides of the glass. This intricate engraving creates an illusion of perspective in his depiction of landscapes and was a popular technique during the 17th and 18th centuries. Sylvia McCosh of Dalemain was instrumental in bringing the gardens of Dalemain House back to life following the war. She had successfully nurtured small plants and seedlings since childhood and faced with the task of bringing a dormant garden to life again, she introduced many plants which flourished in her garden in Lanarkshire, including Meconopsis grandis, and over one hundred varieties of old-fashioned roses. Before her death in 1991, Sylvia started a campaign for a pipe organ in the church to replace the 19th century organ that had been removed in the 1970’s. Following extensive fundraising, the new organ was finally installed in 2002.

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The Church of St Andrew is Grade I Listed.

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Hawes: Dales Countryside Museum

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Hawes Railway Station was at the end of a six mile branch line from Hawes Junction, now known as Garsdale, which met up with the Wensleydale Railway Line built by the North Eastern Railway Company (NER). Constructed of coursed sandstone, the station was built in 1878 in the ornate Derby Gothic style of the Midland Railway. The station buildings and goods shed feature decorated wooden barge boards, dressed stone quoins, lintels and window surrounds. Extended in 1998 by the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, Hawes Station is now home to the Dales Countryside Museum.

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The museum charts the fascinating history of the Yorkshire Dales and of the people who have lived and shaped the local landscape for thousands of years.

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The locomotive, a Robert Stevenson and Hawthorn 0-6-0T has been cosmetically restored, as have the three Mk.1 coaches, and is a replica of the last locomotive to work out of Hawes Station.

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The railway carriages form part of the museum exhibits and a ‘Creation Station’ provides craft activities for young visitors to engage in.

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The museum is also home to the Tourist Information Centre of the largest town in Wensleydale and the converted station buildings offer an insight into the rich heritage of the region.

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Galleries within the museum showcase historical objects with a range of special exhibitions providing a blend of old and new.

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The John Richard Baker exhibition hall was named after the Yorkshire Dales National Park employee who was the inspiration for Calendar Girls

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Weaving machine in the ropemaker’s workshop

Rope and webbing were used in many different ways on Dales farms. Halters, backbands and sheep hopples, creels, burdens and straps for backcans could all be made from the rope and webbing produced at the ropemaker’s workshop at Hawes. The use of rope was not limited to farming and was used for other purposes such as church bell ropes. Although changing farming methods have caused the range of products to alter, the ropeworks in Hawes continues to operate today, and in addition to the traditional farming and horse related products, supplies things to be used in the house and for leisure.

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Mallerstang: Pendragon Castle

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Located to the north of Outhgill in the Vale of Mallerstang are the remains of Pendragon Castle. Reputedly founded by Uther Pendragon, father of King Arthur, the castle was built next to the river Eden in the 12th century. The fortified tower house is important as a Late Norman pele tower and apparently built to stand on its own.

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Originally built by Hugh de Morville in 1173, the castle passed into the ownership of the Clifford family who obtained a licence to crenelate in 1309. The castle was destroyed by the Scots in 1341 and subsequently rebuilt in 1360. The Clifford’s continued to live in the castle until 1541 when it was again destroyed by fire. Lady Anne Clifford restored the castle in 1660 and following her death, the building gradually fell into ruin.

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Fallen masonry has revealed a north entrance with a spiral stair either side of the passage which was closed by a portcullis and Pevsner records vaulted mural chambers in the walls. The castle was eventually dismantled in circa 1685. Pendragon Castle is set in the stunning landscape of Mallerstang and is both a Scheduled Ancient Monument and Grade I Listed.

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Mallerstang: Church of St Mary

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The 20th century east window

Located along the B6259 in the parish of Mallerstang is the Church of St Mary. The Chapel of Ease was founded in the 14th century and was extensively rebuilt in 1663 for Lady Anne Clifford. The single storey building is constructed of coursed squared rubble with a graduated slate roof.

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South porch with semi-circular head and continuous cavetto moulding

The inscription over the south porch (above) details the work of Lady Anne Clifford and is recorded in Roman capitals of typical 17th century character. The inscription reads: “This chapple of Mallerstang after itt had layne ruinous and decayed some 50 or 60 years was newe repayred by the Lady Anne Clifford Countesse Dowager of Pembroke. Dorsett & Montgomery. In the year 1663 who allsoe endowed the same with lands which she purchased in Cawtley near Sedbergh to the yearly value of eleaven pounds for ever. Isiah Chap 58. vs 12. Gods name be praised.”

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The east window (above) was inserted in 1926 and depicts the Virgin Mary and Child surrounded by northern saints, including the Monk of Whitby, Caedmon. The church features a panelled polygonal pulpit which dates to 1798.

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20th century east window detail

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17th century window north wall

The north windows and south doorway date to the rebuilding by Lady Anne Clifford in the 17th century while the south windows date to 1768 when the church was later restored.

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The Church of St Mary is Grade II Listed.

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Chimney & belfry to west end of the church