Sedbergh: Frostrow Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

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Located along the A684 near to Sedbergh is Frostrow Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Constructed of coursed rubble and sandstone, the Chapel was built in 1886 to serve the spiritual needs of the local population. Wesleyan chapels were built in honour of John Wesley, a Christian Church of England priest who founded the Methodist Movement.

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Frostrow Chapel features an entrance porch with arch and central keystone above the doorway, nave with west bellcote and simple fenestration. The outer walls of the nave are now finished in pebble dash. A plaque above the doorway indicates that the Chapel is Wesleyan and bears the date of construction.

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Mallerstang: Church of St Mary

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The 20th century east window

Located along the B6259 in the parish of Mallerstang is the Church of St Mary. The Chapel of Ease was founded in the 14th century and was extensively rebuilt in 1663 for Lady Anne Clifford. The single storey building is constructed of coursed squared rubble with a graduated slate roof.

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South porch with semi-circular head and continuous cavetto moulding

The inscription over the south porch (above) details the work of Lady Anne Clifford and is recorded in Roman capitals of typical 17th century character. The inscription reads: “This chapple of Mallerstang after itt had layne ruinous and decayed some 50 or 60 years was newe repayred by the Lady Anne Clifford Countesse Dowager of Pembroke. Dorsett & Montgomery. In the year 1663 who allsoe endowed the same with lands which she purchased in Cawtley near Sedbergh to the yearly value of eleaven pounds for ever. Isiah Chap 58. vs 12. Gods name be praised.”

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The east window (above) was inserted in 1926 and depicts the Virgin Mary and Child surrounded by northern saints, including the Monk of Whitby, Caedmon. The church features a panelled polygonal pulpit which dates to 1798.

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20th century east window detail

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17th century window north wall

The north windows and south doorway date to the rebuilding by Lady Anne Clifford in the 17th century while the south windows date to 1768 when the church was later restored.

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The Church of St Mary is Grade II Listed.

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Chimney & belfry to west end of the church

Cautley: Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

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Located along Cautley Road in the Yorkshire Dales National Park sits Cautley Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. Dating to 1845, the building is constructed of coursed roughly squared sandstone rubble with quoins. The symmetrical single storey chapel features a round headed doorway with monolithic pilasters and keystone. The round headed windows have four pane glazing and fanlights and the building has an extension added to the north gable. The chapel is Grade II Listed.

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Keld Chapel

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In the small hamlet of Keld stands a medieval stone chapel. The Chapel at Keld is widely believed to have initially been a chantry owned by the monks of Shap Abbey. The monks, belonging to the Premonstatension foundation, dedicated Shap Abbey and the whole valley to God and St. Mary Magdalene. During the Middle Ages, Mary Magdalene was the patron saint of mistresses and it has been suggested that the Abbey was endowed to commemorate a mistress of very high standing. The custom of saying Mass for the repose of the souls of those who had died became increasingly common in the Middle Ages and some very wealthy individuals left money for Mass and prayers to be said in perpetuity for this purpose. By the early part of the 12th century, religious houses were becoming overwhelmed by such bequests and there is evidence that they were interfering with their other day to day activities. One solution to this problem, which would not upset the families of influential patrons, was to build special chapels where these obligations could be fulfilled. These chapels were called chantries.

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Chantries were initially part of the main church but separate buildings were later constructed for the purpose of commemorating the dead. These separate chantry chapels were not common until the mid 14th century. All of the exterior walls of Keld Chapel appear to have been built at the same time and the architecture of the windows would suggest that the building was constructed in the later years of the 15th century. The windows could have been brought from Shap Abbey and the stones used in the doorway are thought likely to have been carved in Roman times.

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There are no records relating to the chapel building in the early years after the dissolution of the Abbey and the first recorded reference details the christening of Ann Burdey, a child of a traveller, on 16th June 1672. Prior to 1698, the chapel had ceased to be used for any religious purpose and had become used as a private dwelling.

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The chapel is constructed of coursed rubble limestone with a single ridge chimney and features a Westmorland slate roof covering. The simple interior has unplastered stonework and the roof has exposed rafters and purlins (above). The inner dividing wall, fireplace and chimney (below) are 19th century additions and while the roof has been restored on a number of occasions, many of the slates are thought to be original.

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Keld Chapel is Grade II Listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.

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Eggleston Hall: Chapel of Ease

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Within the grounds of Eggleston Hall are the ruins of the former Chapel of Ease. There had been a Chapel of Ease on the site since 1539. Dating to the 18th century, the small church is constructed of irregular coursed sandstone and ashlar.

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The former chapel featured a three bay nave and three bay chancel each with round-headed central doorways.

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The private chapel was closed in 1868 with the roof stripped and used on other estate buildings.

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A surviving wall monument (below) features three cherubs heads carved in relief flanked by wide scroll brackets. The ruins of the chapel are Grade II Listed.

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Stapenhill Cemetery Chapel

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The Anglican chapel at Stapenhill Cemetery was built in 1866 by Simpson and Lynam of Nottingham and was designed by the architects Lucy and Littler of Liverpool. The chapel is Decorated Gothic in its architectural style and is typical of the period.

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Varied window tracery and mullions adorn the chapel which features a five sided apse at the west end.

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The steeple is asymmetrically placed at the south west corner. The large east window (above) illuminates the main chapel with smaller windows used to light the side chapels.

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The south entrance with high pointed Gothic style arch and stone coping. The chapel is Grade II Listed.

Ticknall: Medieval Church

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Located near to the present church of St George is the remains of Ticknall medieval church. The medieval church was originally built as a chapel dedicated to St Thomas Becket and was first mentioned in the early 13th century. Completely rebuilt in the 14th century followed by alterations in the 15th century, the chapel became the parish church by 1650. After falling into disrepair during the 19th century, permission was granted to build a larger church – the present church of St George which was built in 1842. The medieval church was blown up with gunpowder in 1841.

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Some of the stone was reused in the building of the new church. There are surviving remains below ground with two fragments of the medieval structure above ground. The surviving walls are constructed of coursed, squared sandstone and ashlar with a surviving three light window with intersecting tracery.

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The remains of the medieval tower and buttresses (above) with part of the west wall which retains the jamb and the first three voussoirs. The medieval church is Grade II Listed and a Scheduled Ancient Monument.