Brougham Hall

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Just a mile south of Penrith is the estate of Brougham Hall. Originally a medieval manor house, the site has been fortified since 1307 and the last battle on English soil was fought in the meadows below Brougham on 18th December 1745 – the climax of the ’45 Rebellion (Jenkins, 2003). The ruin of Brougham Hall conceals a long history. The name Brougham derives from Brocavum, celtic for home of the badgers, and was adopted by the Romans for their fort located one roman mile north east of the Hall. Brocavum Fort commanded the bridge over the River Eamont and controlled the junction of the principle roman road from York to Carlisle with the secondary roman road to Ambleside and Hardnott. Until 1237 Scotland started at Brougham and the St Andrews Cross still flies from local churches. King Alexander, Prince Charles Stuart of Scotland, King Henry II, King Richard I, King Henry III, King Richard III, King James I and King Charles I of England have all had an influence on this area. With history that can be traced back to the Late Neolithic Period, Brougham Hall has been host to many great characters. From Hadrian and his northern defences to Winston Churchill, accompanied by Eisenhower, who came to inspect his top secret C.D.I tanks. These vehicles were used in the first Rhine crossing at Remagen on 7th March 1945. Initially owned by the de Burgham family, ownership of the house was divided into three parts during the 13th century and remained this way until 1676. On the death of Lady Anne Clifford, her share was sold to James Bird, her trusted agent, which gave him full ownership of Brougham. James was responsible for extensive building work and the expansion for the Hall. Part of the estate was already owned by the Broughams prior to James Bird and it wasn’t until John Brougham of Scales bought Brougham Hall in 1726 that the Hall was returned to Brougham ownership. The Lord Chancellor of England, Lord Brougham and Vaux, also lived at Brougham Hall and after successfully defending Queen Caroline against King George IV in 1820, he went on to design the famous Brougham Carriage.

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Brougham Hall received license to crenelate in 1307 and the oldest surviving building above ground level at the Hall is the Tudor building in the courtyard. Dating to around 1480, the door, lower windows and upper west window are all original with two upper windows later installed, as is the machicolation over the door. The date of the building falls at about the most turbulent time in British history when no fewer than four monarchs came and went within a three year period. Richard III was well known in the Penrith area as ‘Lord of the North’ and his reign, between 1483-1485, was also short-lived. The fine studded panelled entrance gates (above) are made of Oak and date to the Tudor period. Still in use every day, the gates have been repaired in finest quality English Oak by a master craftsman, in memory of Brougham’s Clerk of Works, Don Mawdsley, who sadly passed away in 2003. The gateway doors are in a round chamfered arch under a machiolated parapet and originally there was an inner lock which was dated and inscribed AP 1680 (Anne Countess of Pembroke). The nails, bolts and hinges attached to the door also date from the Tudor period. History was made at 11am on 15th October 1905 when King Edward VII set off through this early 17th century gate to Raby Castle, over Stainmore, in the first motorcade in the north of England driven by a British monarch. Setting off along a 54 mile stretch of road (which had been hand-swept to ensure that the king did not get a puncture!), there was a policeman at every intersection pointing in the direction that the king should go. A 40hp plum coloured Mercedes was taken to Brougham Hall from Balmoral specially for the journey and various other motorcars joined in this historic event.

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The First Lord Brougham acquired the Hall in 1810 and under the stewardship of his younger brother William, the house was restored and improved. As Brougham Hall is en route to Balmoral Castle in Scotland, it was host to royalty on several occasions and became known as The Windsor of the North. The house remained in the Brougham family for four generations until the 4th Lord Brougham, Victor Henry Peter, accrued numerous debts and was forced to sell the estate in 1934. Purchased by his neighbour, Major Carleton Cowper, Brougham Hall was stripped and partly demolished. The site retains the fortified walls of the original enclosure and the ruins of the Hall, billiard room, coach archway and the cellars beneath. The remaining buildings are constructed from mixed sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings and the hall range has only the cellars and a few courses of stonework that still survive. The last substantial structure to be built at Brougham was the tower, Lord Chancellor’s Den (below), built by Richard Charles Hussey, Vice President of the RIBA, in 1864. The tower sits on huge foundations of a much earlier tower and incorporates an early example of a Bitumastic damp-proof course. On the ground floor there was a full sized billiard room and in the office above, Henry Peter, Lord Chancellor of England, thought out some of his famous contributions to British history – the Great Reform Bill of 1832, the establishment of the Charity Commission, the reform of the Privy Council, the establishment of the Old Bailey, the establishment (with Bentham and the Prince Consort) of London University and many other far reaching pieces of socialistic legislation. Phase I of the restoration of this tower was completed in 2012 and involved the de-vegetating, stabilising and reinforcing the upper-most part of the ground floor of what will eventually be a three floor tower. The ultimate aim is to house an extensive collection of site specific Regency State papers (an archive containing many of Lord Brougham’s more important documents, which are of national and international importance) and become a public exhibition and scholarship centre. Phase II will involve the reconstruction of the first and second floors and Phase III will involve the archiving and conservation of the aforementioned documents.

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Winston Churchill commandeered Brougham Hall, Lowther Castle and Greystoke Castle in 1942 for the development of an extraordinary weapon. The Canal Defence Light was a top secret weapon devised between the two great wars and a development and testing site was set up in and around Brougham Hall. The tank was equipped with a 13 million candlepower white arc light which had a strobe operating at a frequency that had the effect of temporarily blinding the enemy. These tanks were without any other offensive weaponry and the intention was to move forward in a V formation of 150 tanks which comprised three squadrons of 50 tanks. On 5th May 1942 Winston Churchill drove through the 17th century gateway arch to inspect the Canal Defence Light Tanks and in December of the same year, he returned to watch the trials of this secret weapon. Although the tanks were never used as intended, they were used to illuminate the Rhine for the Remagen crossing on 5th March 1945 and for operations in Mesopotamia and north Eastern India. A plaque under the staircase in the courtyard has been erected, unveiled by Brigadier Ewan Morrison on 16th July 1992, dedicated to the memory of the officers and men who served at Brougham Hall between July 1942 and June 1944. These men were drawn from the 1st and 35th Tank Brigades of the 79th Armoured Division and were supported by the R.E.M.E. who left in 1945. After the war, the army camp at Brougham was used as a displaced persons camp until the early 1950’s and thereafter, it was used by the Ministry of Supply as a petrol dump.

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Over the next couple of decades Brougham Hall became a neglected ruin despite being purchased by two companies who had intended to make commercial gain from the land. Christopher Terry had fallen in love with the dilapidated Hall during the 1960’s and after hearing of plans to build on the land, he acquired Brougham in 1985. The Brougham Hall Charitable Trust was founded in 1986 and for one peppercorn, Christopher Terry transferred the Hall to the Trust on 8th October of the same year. Committed to conservation, Christopher has intended to restore Brougham as it was externally and having been rescued from dereliction, restoration work also commenced in 1986. Now home to an array of arts and crafts workshops and businesses, the Hall has a restored Tudor Block, Brewery and Stable Block. Priority is given to the parts of the building that are in most urgent need of attention and original building materials are being re-used wherever possible. Brougham Hall has its own skilled craftsmen and thankfully, there are sufficient drawings, photographs and paintings to be certain of the external appearance of the building.

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While the tracery of the ornate windows looks delicate, it actually weighs well over a ton. One of the windows in the Lord Chancellor’s Den was repaired by master craftsmen in May 2005 and it took three men to lift the larger pieces of stone. The sculpture of Christ (below) is the work of Josefina de Vasconcellos who continued to visit Brougham long after her 100th birthday. Helen Beatrix Potter was also a frequent visitor to Brougham Hall as her brother in law, the Reverend Arthur John Heelis, was the Rector of Brougham from 1900-1922. The Rev Heelis had a Phoenix three-wheeled car, which is still in existence and this was the sixth car to be registered in Westmorland. Beatrix Potter complained often about having to push this car to a start every time she came to Brougham! On one of her visits, she gave a copy of ‘The Tale of Peter Rabbit’ to Eileen Brougham for her birthday and signed the flyleaf: “to Princess Eileen, on Peace Day, Brougham, August 23rd 1919”. Peace Day was chosen to celebrate the official end of the War. Beatrix Potter’s husband, William Heelis, was a solicitor and he chaired a Coroner’s inquest after James Maughan from Byker in Northumberland was killed by falling masonry in the Lord Chancellor’s Den. Maughan was 22 years old and his demise was pronounced “accidental death” in the days before Health & Safety. The co founder of the National Trust Canon Rawnsley was also a frequent visitor to Brougham Hall.

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In November 2010, Brougham obtained full planning consent and listed building consent to proceed with one of the very few specially built political archive centres in the country. This consent was expanded in October 2013 to include the greater part of the remainder of the Hall. Of British Library calibre, the best of Brougham’s papers, of which many are hand illuminated on vellum, are to be mounted in a rotating exhibition in the Lord Chancellor’s actual office at Brougham. The display will be on two levels – a public exhibition and a separate static one for students of Politics and Economics and scholars. One of the buildings in the courtyard is devoted to the preservation of parts of the history and heritage of Brougham Hall and the encouragement of vernacular skills. NADFAS are currently engaged on a three year programme to clean and restore a 1675 Flemish Oak screen which once adorned the Brougham Armour Hall until the sale of the 1930’s. It was then removed to a church in Ayrshire, the roof of which collapsed onto the screen causing considerable damage which is now being rectified. Other projects involve workshops and the restoration of a Brougham Carriage, made in Paris in 1894, the restoration of two mid 18th century sphinx and the restoration of a stained glass window for the Lord Chancellor’s Den.

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From 1837 Brougham Hall has had a fascinating and varied vehicular history. Designed by the first Lord Brougham, the Brougham Carriage was the veritable Volkswagen of horse drawn vehicles. In 1837 Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux, Whig Politician, and Lord Chancellor to William IV, perceived a need which would make his mark on the carriage world forever. With coachmen and grooms waiting into the small hours for debates to finish in the Palace of Westminster, his usual form of transport was cumbersome and labour intensive. Brougham thought there was a need for “a refined and glorified street cab that would make a convenient carriage for a gentleman, and especially for a man of such independence of ideas as one who carried his own carpet bag on occasions when time was important and his own servants otherwise employed!” (Furnival, 1999). This carriage was the first to have elliptical springs and his revolutionary design included the necessity of being light and compact and needing only one horse and coachman. Lord Brougham’s coach builders, Messrs Sharp and Bland of South Audley Street, advised him that his designs would never find popular appeal. To their eternal discredit, they completely failed to recognise the potential of Lord Brougham’s design. Lord Brougham duly took his design round the corner to the Mount Street premises of a neighbouring firm, Robinson and Cook (later to become Cook and Holdway of Halkin Place, London), and on 15th May 1838 the first Brougham Carriage rolled off the production line. Thousands of this carriage were eventually produced in factories all around the world. The original 1838 Brougham Carriage, which was used by Lord Brougham, Gladstone and Disraeli, was restored in 1977 by the company of Coachmakers and Coach Harness Markers to commemorate HM Queen Elizabeth II’s Silver Jubilee. It was exhibited that year at Ascot and the Guildhall and then presented to the Science Museum in South Kensington.

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1838 Brougham Carriage (Ragley Hall Collection)

 In 1995 the fourth Lord Brougham purchased two eight litre Bentleys, of which only 100 of these vehicles were ever made, and both cars are still in existence. Wolfie Benarto, the Chairman and owner of Bentley Motors, was a regular visitor to house parties at Brougham Hall. In 1931 Rolls Royce bought Bentley Motors and on 16th May 2004, Brougham Hall played host to the Rolls Royce & Bentley Enthusiasts Club who were celebrating the centenary of Mr Royce meeting Mr Rolls. Cumbria Classic Cars makes an annual visit to Brougham Hall with numerous other arts festivals and events held throughout the year.

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Courtyard Door Knocker Brougham Hall

There are only four known examples of the 12th century design of the door knocker (above) in existence – two are in Durham and two from Brougham. Both of the Durham rings were bronze and the sanctuary ring on the north door of Durham Cathedral (below) is considered to be “one of the most striking achievements of Romanesque bronze casting” (Archaeologia, Vol 107 1982). During the medieval period, Durham Cathedral offered St Cuthbert’s protection to fugitives who had committed a great offence. Those claiming sanctuary held onto the ring of the Sanctuary Knocker, which dates to 1172, until a monk admitted them into the Cathedral. Sanctuary seekers were given a black robe to wear and offered 37 days of sanctuary in the Cathedral, after which they either chose to stand trial or were taken to the coast and sent into exile. The right of sanctuary was abolished in 1623. Concern was expressed for the safety of the Sanctuary Knocker at Durham Cathedral in 1977 and eventually the decision was taken to remove it and replace it with a copy. There was no evidence to suggest that the ring had been removed previously and for the first time, it was possible to thoroughly examine the ring in laboratory conditions. The Victoria and Albert Museum carried out metallurgical tests and the British Museum made a cast (Archaeologia, Vol 107 1982). The original Sanctuary Knocker is displayed in the Durham Cathedral Treasury with the copy now hanging on the north door. The Brougham ring was made of iron and similar to the one at Durham Cathedral, it faced due north, on the courtyard gate. The Brougham ring was stolen and in an attempt to replace it, the Brougham Hall Charitable Trust asked the Bishop of Durham for consent to use the mould cast by the British Museum. Although the Bishop was amenable, the Dean and Chapter were not so the long task of drawing another from the monster’s head began. Carved in wood, a sand mould, in seven pieces, was taken from the wooden head and finally cast in bronze by Collier’s Foundry in Sussex in 1993. This copy now graces the courtyard door at Brougham Hall.

Brougham Hall is Grade II* Listed.

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Sanctuary Knocker Durham Cathedral

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Shildon: National Railway Museum

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The National Railway Museum in Shildon was opened in October 2004 and is based on the Timothy Hackworth Victorian Railway Museum. Timothy Hackworth was recruited by George Stephenson in 1824 to oversee the building of the Stockton & Darlington Railway, engine houses and stationary engines. He was responsible for building locomotives for the company and he became the railway’s superintendent in 1825. The Welcome building was constructed in 1888 as a Sunday School for the Methodist Chapel and became a clothing factory in the 1960’s. The building became the entrance for the museum in 2004 and is now home to the original Sans Pareil locomotive which was built by Timothy Hackworth to compete in the Rainhill Trials in 1829 for the newly created Liverpool & Manchester Railway.

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Prior to the National Railway Museum, the Patent Office Museum, now the Science Museum in London, started its collected of railway artefacts in 1862. Railway companies began preserving their history from the late 19th century and a museum dedicated to railways was opened in 1927 in York by the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER). Although the Great Western Railway (GWR), the London, Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS), the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) and the Southern Railway (SR) had all collected significant quantities of railway heritage material by the 1930’s, it wasn’t until the nationalisation of the railways in 1948 that these collections were all brought together.

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A curator of historical relics of the nationalised transport industries was appointed in 1951 and adding to the existing York Railway Museum, the Museum of British Transport in Clapham was opened by British Railways. The 1968 Transport Act encouraged British Railways to work in conjunction with the Science Museum to develop a National Railway Museum to house the ever expanding collection. The very first national museum (National Railway Museum) outside of London was opened in 1975 at the former steam locomotive depot near York Minster.

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The National Railway Museum in York has expanded on numerous occasions since 1975 and now has a purpose built rail training centre – a base for the NRM’s education team. The National Railway Museum in Shildon, also known as Locomotion, was the first national museum to be built in the North East. The birthplace of the modern railway, and with grants from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the European Regional Development Fund, this joint venture ensures the continued preservation of railway heritage and enables the collections to be conserved properly.

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Built up over the past 80 years, the collection at Shildon has over 100 locomotives and almost 200 items relating to the story of the railway from the early 19th century to the present day. One of the carriages in the Collection Building houses a 1924 12/50 ‘Duck’s back’ Alvis. This vehicle was used by the 20th century English writer Tom Rolt who led numerous campaigns to preserve our national heritage. Used as his general runaround in the early days of the Vintage Sports Car Club, the vehicle was purchased in 1934 for £10 and is still owned by the Rolt family. In 1959, Tom drove this car on a section of the M1 motorway whilst it was being built – from near Luton to beyond Watford Gap. This journey was part of his research for a pamphlet he was writing for John Laing & Sons who were the main contractors for the road.

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The original Sans Pareil is displayed in the Welcome Building and although it was more powerful, it proved not to have the speed of Stephenson’s Rocket. A working replica of Rocket is housed at the museum and was designed by Robert Stephenson in 1979 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Rainhill Trials. The working replica of Timothy Hackworth’s Sans Pareil (above) was built in 1979 by apprentices at British Rail’s Shildon workshop. First steamed in April 1980, the replica and original have been together at Shildon since 2004.

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Part of the collection includes the stunning steam locomotive built by London Midland & Scottish Railway, 5MT class, in black and designed by William Stanier in 1935. Locomotive No 34051 Winston Churchill is also displayed in the Collection Building. One of 44 members of the Battle of Britain class produced by the Southern Railway between 1945 and 1950, these locomotives were all named after the people, aircraft, fighter squadrons and airfields involved in the Battle of Britain. Mid Hants Railway Ropley Works have undertaken painstaking work to restore the Battle of Britain class loco back to its original condition.

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One of the major exhibitions at Shildon is the royal train collection which displays the splendour and quality of coaches used by members of the royal family during the early 20th century. The Hardwicke No. 790 (above) is currently at the head of the royal train and is a steam locomotive of “Jumbo” Class. A new speed record was set in 1895 during the era of the Race to the North when Hardwicke took 2 hours and 6 minutes to travel between Crewe and Carlisle. This fabulous locomotive was designed by F.W.Webb and was built in Crewe in 1873, withdrawn in 1932.

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Other locomotives included in the Collection Building include Imperial No 1. 1956 which was one of the last but one fireless locomotives to be built by the Andrew Barclay Company in Kilmarnock. Working in the Imperial Paper Mills at Gravesend, such fireless engines were used in certain locations where the fire of an ordinary steam locomotive would present a hazard. Although diesel and electric locomotives were available by 1956, fireless locomotives were much cheaper to build and to operate in plant where large quantities of steam were readily available.

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Orion (above) is a working model of a London & North Western Railway express passenger locomotive. This beautiful working 1/6 scale model was made by Mr G.R.S. Darroch who was an apprentice at Crewe works. With some of the parts being made at Crewe Mechanics Institute, Orion is one of the few genuine examples of LNWR locomotives still in existence. The original locomotive named Orion was built in 1902 at Crewe works to pull express passenger trains on the West Coast Main Line. The full size locomotive was scrapped in 1928 so this wonderful 1905 model remains a tangible link with Crewe’s golden age.

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Other railway relics in the collection include underground mining locomotives and tank wagons. The last locomotive out of Ellington Colliery in Northumberland in 2005 was Underground Mining Locomotive No 14. A diesel mechanical locomotive was used for coal haulage and No. 14 was built by Hudswell Clarke of Leeds in 1961. Below is a Shell-Mex and British Petroleum Limited Tank Wagon. Registered with Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway, the rectangular wagon was built in 1901 for carrying oil and was claimed from Falmouth Docks.

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As part of Shildon Shed Bash held in July this year and inspired by famous “Shed Bashes” of the 1950’s and 1960’s, this special event welcomed the world famous Flying Scotsman. Joined by A4 60009 Union of South Africa, V2 4771 Green Arrow, Q6 63395 and D9002 Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, this historic event was a wonderful occasion for rail enthusiasts.

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Originally built in Doncaster in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway, the Flying Scotsman was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley and was one of the most powerful locomotives used by the railway. Selected to appear at the British Empire Exhibition in London, the locomotive was given the name Flying Scotsman, after the London to Edinburgh rail service which started in 1862, and renumbered 4472. The Scotsman was officially the first locomotive in the UK to reach 100mph on a special test run and reducing the journey to eight hours, produced the first ever non stop London to Edinburgh service in 1928.

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In 2004, a campaign spearheaded by the National Railway Museum resulted in saving this beautiful locomotive and confirmed its status as a national treasure. Having undergone extensive restoration in the workshop of Riley & Son Ltd since 2006, this railway legend is once again on Britain’s tracks. The oldest mainline working locomotive, this steam icon has remained in Britain with support from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Heritage Lottery Fund. Although the Flying Scotsman was undoubtedly the star of the show, the National Railway Museum in Shildon is a fantastic working museum conserving a rich industrial heritage for future generations.

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Ulverston: 1955 Jaguar XK140 Fixed Head Coupe

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The above Jaguar is part of the collection at Lakeland Motor Museum. There were three body styles in the XK120/140/150 range – the fixed head coupe (as above), the drop head coupe and the super sports – often called the roadster which featured a simpler hood, side screens rather than wind up windows and a more water resistant dashboard covering. Similar to the Jaguar XK120, wire wheels or wire-spoke wheels were an optional extra whereas cars with the standard disc wheels had spats (fender skirts) over the rear wheel opening. This stunning Jaguar also features a heavier full width bumper rather than the two lightweight thin bumpers found on the XK120.

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Ulverston: 1937 Triumph T70 Tiger 250cc

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The Triumph Tiger range was introduced by Edward Turner following his installation as Chief Designer and General Manager at Triumph Engineering. The motorcycle producing arm of Triumph hadn’t been performing well in the early 1930’s and was sold off in 1936 to JY Sangster of Ariel. Valentine Page was a British motorcycle designer who worked for several of the UK’s leading marques, including Ariel, Triumph, and BSA. Edward Turner took Page’s range of 2/1, 3/1 and 5/1 (250, 350 and 500cc single cylinders) adding chrome petrol tanks, upswept exhausts and polished crankcases, and gave them Tiger 70, 80 and 90 models names relating to their top. This particular model above is on display at Lakeland Motor Museum and was bought new in October 1937 by Sydney Waterfield of Manchester. He used the motorcycle extensively for commuting as well as pleasure trips including visits to the Isle of Man TT, Silverstone and other race circuits. After WWII, rear suspension became popular on new motorcycles and the bike was converted from the original rigid rear end to a swing-arm and dual seat. It is believed that this is a McCandless design, produced under license by Feridax, who still produce motorcycling accessories and clothing. Continuing to use the motorcycle throughout the 1960’s and 1970’s, Mr Waterfield made a note of all maintenance work undertaken. He had a second engine which he refurbished and swapped over every summer. Upon his retirement in 1980, it remained untouched in his garage until his death in 1999. His family arranged its restoration to the fantastic condition seen today.

Ulverston: 1928 Douglas Model E28 600cc

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British brothers William and Edward Douglas founded the Douglas Motorcycle company in Bristol in 1882. The firm was founded as a blacksmiths and iron foundry, producing their first motorcycle, a 2.75Hp flat twin, in 1907. The company won an army contract during WW1 and produced 25,000 machines for the use of dispatch riders on the worst terrain of the front. The above rare model is on display at Lakeland Motor Museum and features a horizontally opposed engine – also known as a flat twin or boxer, mounted longitudinally – in line with the length of the frame (See the two cylinder heads, one behind the front wheel and the other towards the back wheel). The Fore and Aft description is the nautical term for a boat with its sails in line with its keel, such as on a sloop or a schooner. Later motorcycles used this engine configuration but mounted transversely (across the frame). The design meant the motorcycle was longer than others with single cylinder, or v-twin engines, and is more suited to riding on straight roads than twisty ones. That said, Douglas had success in motorcycle racing, speedway and trials events – even securing wins at the Isle of Man TT races with various sporting models. For almost three years, the Dirt Track Douglas was the supreme dirt track machine selling around 1200 in 1929 alone. In the 1920’s, Douglas built the first disc brakes and had a Royal Warrant for the supply of motorcycles to the Princes, Albert and Henry. Following bankruptcy in 1935, Douglas reappeared after WWII with a range of motorcycles that were far less successful than the Vespa scooter they imported and produced under license. The 1955 350cc Douglas Dragonfly was the last model produced by the company. Westinghouse Brake and Signal bought Douglas out and production of Douglas Motorcycles ended in 1957. Douglas continued to import Vespa scooters into the UK and later imported and assembled Gilera motorcycles.

Ulverston: 1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia Spider Type 101.19

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Italian car manufacturer Alfa Romeo began in 1910 as A.L.F.A – Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili. During the First World War, entrepreneur Nicola Romeo took over the firm and in 1920 they returned to car production with the new company name. The Milan based factory only made vehicles in left hand drive except for a small batch of 404 Giulia Spiders, all produced in 1963 and sold to right hand drive markets, including Britain, Australasia and South Africa. The above example was one of the last produced, only selling in September 1964.

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Spider is the name Alfa Romeo and Ferrari used to describe its cabriolet/roadster models. Many vehicle body styles come from horse drawn vehicle descriptions, both Cabriolet and Roadster are used to describe a vehicle with only one row of seats, a folding hood and no window frames – a convertible differs in that it can have two rows of seats and possibly fixed side window frames.

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This model was based on the previous Giuletta Spider – rather than the new Giulia’s underpinnings, but using the Giulia’s larger and more powerful 1600cc twin overhead camshaft 4 cylinder engine – the only external difference in the two models is the raised bonnet centre which is to clear the taller engine. This fabulous vehicle is on display in the Lakeland Motor Museum and is 1 of 404 made in right hand drive.

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Ulverston: 1886 Benz Patent Motorwagen

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On display at Lakeland Motor Museum is the above model of the 1886 Benz Patent Motorwagen. The 1886 Benz was the first motor vehicle ever that was successfully powered by internal combustion. There was already automobiles that were powered by steam or electricity but the German engine designer, Karl Benz, secured success for his invention on 29th January 1886 when he presented his stroke of genius at the Imperial Patent Office. His single-cylinder 4-stroke engine with a displacement of 0.954 of a litre anticipated elements still found in every internal combustion engine to this day: a crankshaft with balance weights, electric ignition and water cooling: enough to generate 0.55 kW and a top speed of 16 km/h, virtually corresponding to the power of a whole horse. This beautiful model is the first 1:8 scale precision die-cast.

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