Grasmere War Memorial

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Located on a low outcrop in Broadgate Recreation Ground stands the village war memorial. Dedicated to those who fought in both World Wars, the freestanding monument is of local slate and was designed by William Gershon Collingwood – secretary to John Ruskin. Born in Liverpool in 1854, Collingwood settled in Gillhead following an academic career at Oxford. Heavily influenced by John Ruskin and William Morris, he developed a life-long interest in Norse settlement, art and language which prompted his research into the Pre-Norman crosses of Cumbria and the north of England. An expert on Anglo-Saxon crosses, Collingwood also designed Ruskin’s grave in St Andrew’s Church in Coniston.

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Below the wheel head is the figure of a dove and below that a stag is trampling a dragon. An inscription below honours the men of Grasmere as follows: “In honour of the men of Grasmere who fought and in ever thankful memory of the men who died for God for King for home for freedom peace & right in the Great War.” There are no names listed on the memorial – the village dead are listed on a plaque in the nearby 12th century church of St Oswald.

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The memorial verse at the base of the monument reads: “These died in war that we in peace might live. They gave their best so we our best should give. Not for themselves, for freedom home & right. They died and bid us forward to the fight. See you to it that they shall not have died in vain.” The inscription was written by the poet, writer and conservationist Anglican clergyman Canon Hardwicke.D.Rawnsley who was the secretary of the memorial committee. Rawnsley had retired to Allan Bank in 1917 after serving as Vicar of Crosthwaite for 34 years. A close friend of Collingwood, it is thought likely that Rawnsley invited him to design the monument.

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Penrith: Black Angel Memorial

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On elevated ground over-looking Penrith Castle stands the war memorial known locally as The Black Angel. The monument was originally unveiled in 1906 in Corney Square and is dedicated to the men from Penrith who died during the Boer War in South Africa (1899−1902).

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The monument was moved to its current position in Castle Park in 1964 due to concerns from pollution damage. The central panel lists the names of those who lost their lives and is surmounted by a winged angel holding a wreath. The name, The Black Angel, also refers to the book of the same name by Colin Bardgett. The book details the stories and letters written by men of the Penrith Volunteer Company who fought during the Boer War. Not only is the book a military record, it contains a Roll of Honour and valuable information relating to local history. The Black Angel, both book and monument, are a memorial to the Volunteer Companies of Cumberland and Westmorland.

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With little camera exposure (below), the monument lives up to its name by taking the physical appearance of The Black Angel.

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Nithsdale: New Abbey War Memorial

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On the A710 next to Sweetheart Abbey stands New Abbey War Memorial. Dedicated to the memory of those lost in the Great War (1914-1918), the monument is of rough surfaced granite and set upon a stepped plinth. An ornamental sword adorns the cross shaft and the memorial lists thirty six names of those who lost their lives.

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Riga: Barikādes Piemineklis

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Located on Jēkaba Iela (Jacob Street) is a pyramidal memorial which was unveiled in 2007 by the State President Vaira Vīķe-Freiberga. The monument is dedicated to those who lost their lives during the confrontations, known as The Barricades,  between Latvian and Soviet Union forces in 1991. The inscription details wording from a Latvian folk song.

Burton Upon Trent: War Memorial

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Located on Lichfield Street is the war memorial sculpture which was unveiled in 1922 by Earl Dartmouth. The sculpture was designed by the British monumental and architectural sculptor, Henry Charles Fehr.

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The sculpture features an angel which stands upon a stone pillar with a laurel wreath in one hand and a sword in the other. The two bronze sculpted figures beneath the angel are St George (above left) and a symbol of peace or victory (above right) holding a dove.

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Coniston: World War Memorial

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In the grounds of St Andrews Church in Coniston is a memorial dedicated to the men of Coniston who lost their lives in both World Wars. First erected in 1921, the monument is made of sandstone and was designed by W.G.Collingwood. The monument features a celtic cross and is inscribed with all the names of local men who lost their lives.

Riga: Brīvības Piemineklis

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In the historic centre of Riga on Brīvības Bulvāris is the Brīvības Piemineklis – Freedom Monument. The colossal monument is symbolic of Latvia’s struggle for independence and freedom with several stages each representing significant figures and events during the history of Latvia.

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The granite monument stands 42.5 metres high and is the work of the Latvian sculptor Kārlis Zāle. Financed entirely from public donations, the monument was unveiled in November 1935 with construction lasting four years.

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Striving for freedom is represented with the ‘Chain Breakers’ attempting to break free.

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The front of the monument features travertine reliefs of Latvian Riflemen symbolising the Russian Revolution and Latvian War of Independence.

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The monument features a woman in copper above the marble obelisk. The three golden stars the woman holds represent the historic regions Kurzeme, Vidzeme, and Latgale.